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Lies against Popes St. Marcellinus, St. Martin I, and St. Eugenius I

Some lie filled people are spreading lies against three Popes, St. Marcellinus, St. Martin I, and St. Eugenius I.

Lie against Pope St. Marcellinus from an apocryphal book that contains a defamatory biography of St. Marcellinus:

Some error filled people, have tried to say the Gregory XVII, who was under duress for 30 years by the freemasons, lost his papacy for possibly offering the new Mass... see this:

The Roman Breviary reads on April 5th. "During the cruel persecution of the Emperor Diocletian. Marcellinus of Rome, overcome with terror, offered incense to the idols of the gods. For this sin he did penance and wearing a hair-shirt went to the Council of Sinuesso, where many Bishops had assembled and there openly confessed his crime."

This act didn't constituted the loss of the papacy, since it was done under grave duress at the time. Pope St. Marcellinus is listed obviously on the official list of popes.

"Pope Marcellinus ruled the Church of Rome for nine years and four months. By order of Emperors Diocletian and Maximian he was taken prisoner and brought forward to offer sacrifice to the idols. At first he refused and was threatened with various kinds of torture, and for fear of the threatened suffering he put down two grains of incense in sacrifice to the gods. This gave great joy to the infidels but caused the faithful immense sadness.

However, under a weak head, members rise up and make little of the threats of the princes, so the faithful came to the Pope and reproached him severely. He realized the gravity of his error and offered himself to be judged by a council of Bishops. The Bishops responded: “It is not possible for the Supreme Pontiff to be judged by anyone, but you yourself weigh your case in your own mind and pronounce your own judgment.”

The Pope, repentant, lamented his fault and deposed himself, but the whole gathering immediately re-elected him. When the Emperors heard of this, they had him arrested again. He absolutely refused to offer sacrifice to the idols, so they sentenced him to be beheaded. Then the persecution was renewed with such a fury that in one month 17,000 Christians were put to death.

When Marcellinus was about to be beheaded, he declared himself unworthy of Christian burial and excommunicated all who might presume to bury him. Thus his body lay above ground for 35 days. At the end of that time the Apostle Peter appeared to Marcellus, who had succeeded as Pope and said: “Brother Marcellus, why do you not bury me?” Marcellus replied: “Have you not yet been buried, my Lord?” Peter: “ I consider myself unburied as long as Marcellinus is unburied!” “But don’t you know, my Lord,” Marcellus asked, “that he laid a curse on anyone who buried him?” Peter: “Is it not written that he who humbles himself shall be exalted? You should have kept this in mind! Now go and bury him at my feet.” Marcellus went straightaway and carried out the orders laudably." (From the Golden Legend by Blessed Jacobus of Voragine)

It is important to note that aforementioned book “The Golden Legend” was published in a way of the violation of Ecclesiastical Legislation on Books, i.e. without permission of the competent Hierarchy, and contains a defamatory account concerning Pope St. Marcellinus.

Lies against Popes St. Martin I and St. Eugenius I:

"Yet, Pope St. Martin I, who recognized Antipope Eugene I, did not cease being pope [forfeit his office]".

In order to see how the propagators of the “hidden pope” have distorted the facts from the biography of the Popes, please read the following biographies of St. Marcellinus, St. Martin I and St. Eugenius I from the Catholic books.

Rev. Arthur Devine says:

“A lie in doctrinal matters, such as announcing false miracles, exhibiting false relics, or corrupting the lives of the saints, would be against religion, and have the malice of irreligion attached to it.” (1)

POPE ST. MARCELLINUS:

THE BOOK OF SAINTS
COMPILED BY THE BENEDICTINE MONKS OF ST. AUGUSTINE'S ABBEY, RAMSGATE:

MARCELLINUS (St.) Pope, M. (April 26) (4th cent.) A Roman by birth, St. Marcellinus sat in the Chair of St. Peter from a.d. 296 to a.d. 304, during a period when the persecution of Christianity was so unrelenting that no less than seventeen thousand of the Faithful were put to death because of their religion. The Pope suffered with three others in Rome, a.d. 304; and the four bodies are said to have been left exposed in the Forum to intimidate their fellow-believers. The legend that St. Marcellinus had on one occasion yielded in the torture chamber and offered incense to an idol, afterwards repenting of his weakness, is now generally discredited. (2)

LIVES OF THE SAINTS
By Rev. ALBAN BUTLER:

April 26. - STS. CLETUS and MARCELLINUS, Popes, Martyrs.

ST. Cletus was the third Bishop of Rome, and succeeded St. Linus, which circumstance alone shows his eminent virtue among the first disciples of St. Peter in the West. He sat twelve years, from 76 to 89. The canon of the Roman Mass, Bede, and other martyrologists, style him a martyr. He was buried near St. Linus, in the Vatican, and his relics still remain in that church.

St. Marcellinus succeeded St. Caius in the bishopric of Rome in 296, about the time that Diocletian set himself up for a deity, and impiously claimed divine honors. In those stormy times of persecution Marcellinus acquired great glory. He sat in St. Peter's chair eight years, three months, and twenty-five days, dying in 304, a year after the cruel persecution broke out, in which he gained much honor. He has been styled a martyr, though his blood was not shed in the cause of religion. (3)

THE CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA, VOLUME IX:

Marcellinus died in the second year of the persecution and, in all probability, a natural death. No trustworthy sources of the fourth or fifth century mention him as a martyr. His name does not occur either in the list of martyrs or the bishops in the Roman "Chronograph" of the year 354. Neither is he mentioned in the "Martyrologium Hieronymianum" The "Marcellinus episcopus" on 4 Oct. in "Codex Bernensis" (ed. De Rossi-Duchesne, 120 is probably not identical with the pope. In mentioning Marcellinus, Eusebius uses an obscure expression; he merely says: "the persecution also affected him" ("Hist. Eccl.", VII, 32). From this one must obviously conclude that the pope did not suffer martyrdom, otherwise Eusebius would have distinctly stated it. There were even later reports in circulation that accused him of having given up the sacred books after the first edict, or even of having offered incense to the gods, to protect himself from the persecution. But the sources in which this reproach is clearly stated are very questionable.

The Donatist Bishop Petilianus of Constantine in Africa asserted, in the letter he wrote in 400 and 410, that Marcellinus and the Roman priests Melchiades, Marcellus, and Sylvester (his three successors) had given up the sacred books, and had offered incense. But he could not adduce any proof. In the Acts of confiscation of the church buildings at Rome, which at the great Carthaginian conference between Catholics and Donatists, were brought forward by the latter, only two Roman deacons, Straton and Cassius, were named as traitors. St. Augustine, in his replies to Petilianus, disputes the truth of the latter's report ("Contra litteras Petiliani", II, 202: "De cjuibus et nos solum respondemus: aut non probatis et ad neminem pertinet, aut probatis et ad nos non pertinet"; "De unico baptismo contra Petilianum", cap. xvi: "Ipse scelestos et sacrilegos fuisse dicit; ego innocents fuisse respondeo").

One can only conclude from Petilianus's accusation that such rumours against Marcellinus and Roman priests were circulated in Africa; but that they could not be proved, otherwise St. Augustine would not have been able to assert the innocence of the accused so decidedly, or safely to have referred to the matter at the Carthaginian conference. But even in Rome similar stories were told of Marcellinus in certain circles, so that in two later legendary reports a formal apostasy was attributed to this pope, of course followed by repentance and penance. The biography of Marcellinus in the "Liber Pontificalis", which probably alludes to a lost "passio" of his, relates that he was led to the sacrifice that he might scatter incense, which he did. But after a few days he was seized with remorse, and was condemned to death by Diocletian with three other Christians, and beheaded. It is clear that this report attempts to combine a rumour that the pope had offered incense to the gods, with the fact that, in other circles he was regarded as a martyr and his tomb venerated.

At the beginning of the sixth century, rather later than this "passio Marcellini", a collection of forged documents appeared, which were manufactured in the dispute between Pope Symmachus and Laurentius. Among them are also found apocryphal Acts of an alleged synod of 300 bishops, which took place in 303 at Sinuessa (between Rome and Capua), in order to inquire into the accusation against Marcellinus that he had sacrificed at Diocletian's order. On the first two days Marcellinus had denied everything, but on the third day he admitted his lapse and repented; however the synod passed no sentence on him "quia prima sedes non judicatur a quoquam". When Diocletian learnt of the occurrence, he had the pope and several bishops of this synod executed (Hefele, "Konziliengeschichte", I, 2 Aufl. 143-45). The spuriousness of these acts is almost certain. The forger has made the most of the rumour of Marcellinus's lapse for his own purposes in a different way from the author of the "passio", which crept into the "Liber Pontificalis".

These apocryphal fragments cannot by themselves be considered as historical proofs, any more than the rumors in Donatist circles in Africa. It is accepted as certain that the pope did not comply with the imperial edict by any overt act, such as the surrender of the sacred writings, or even the offering of incense before the statue of a god. Such an apostasy of a Roman bishop would without a doubt have been given the greatest prominence by contemporary authors. Eusebius has not made use of the above mentioned idea. And later, Theodoret was still less in a position to state in his "Church History", that Marcellinus had been prominent in the persecution (Hist. Eccl., I, 2). And Augustine also would not have been able to assert so curtly in answer to Petilian, that Marcellinus and the priests accused with him as traitors and "lapsi" were innocent.

On the other hand it is remarkable, that in the Roman "Chronograph" whose first edition was in 336, the name of this pope alone is missing, while all other popes from Lucius I onwards are forthcoming. ... Then Marcellinus is lacking not only in the "Chronograph", but also in the "Martyrologium Hieronymianum", and in all fifth and sixth century lists of popes. This omission is therefore not accidental, but intentional. In connection with the above mentioned rumours and the narratives of apocryphal fragments, it must indeed be admitted that in certain circles at Rome the conduct of the pope during the Diocletian persecution was not approved. In this persecution we know of only two Roman clerics who were martyred: the priest Marcellinus and the exorcist Petrus. The Roman bishop and the other members of the higher clergy, except the above clerics, were able to elude the persecutors. How this happened we do not know. It is possible that Pope Marcellinus was able to hide himself in a safe place of concealment in due time, as many other bishops did. But it is also possible that at the publication of the edict he secured his own immunity; in Roman circles this would have been imputed to him as weakness, so that his memory suffered thereunder, and he was on that account omitted by the author of the "Depositio Episcoporum" from the "Chronograph", while he found a place in the "Catologus Liberianus", which was almost contemporary. But his tomb was venerated by the Christians of Rome, and he was afterwards recognized as a martyr, as the "passio" shows. Marcellinus died in 304. The day of his death is not certain; in the "Liber Pontificalis" his burial is wrongly placed at 26 April, and this date is retained in the historical martyrologies of the ninth century, and from them, in the later martyrologies. But if we calculate the date of his death from the duration of his office given in the Liberian Catalogue, he would have died on 24 or 25 Oct., 304. His body was interred in the Catacomb of Priscilla on the Via Salaria, near the crypt where the martyr Crescentius found his resting-place. The Catacomb of Callistus, the official burial place of the Roman Church, where the predecessors of Marcellinus were buried during several decades, was evidently confiscated in the persecution, while the Catacomb of Priscilla, belonging to the Acilii Glabriones, was stil at the disposal of the Christians.

The tomb of Marcellinus was venerated at a very early date by the Christians of Rome. The precise statements about its position, in the "Liber Pontificalis", indicate this. In one of the seventh century itineraries of the graves of the Roman martyrs, in the "Epitome de locis ss. martyrum", it is expressly mentioned among the sacred graves of the Catacomb of Priscilla (De Rossi, "Roma sotterranea", I, 176). In the excavations at this catacomb the crypt of St. Crescentius, beside which was the burial chamber of Marcellinus, was satisfactorily identified. But no monument was discovered which had reference to this pope. The precise position of the burial chamber is therefore still uncertain. The lost "passio" of Marcellinus written towards the end of the fifth century, which was utilized by the author of the "Liber Pontificalis", shows that he was honoured as a martyr at that time; nevertheless his name appears first in the "Martyrology" of Bede, who drew his account from the "Liber Pontificalis" (Quentin, "Les martyrologes historiques", 103, sq.). This feast is on 26 April. The earlier Breviaries, which follow the account of the "Liber Pontificalis" concerning his lapse and his repentance, were altered in 1883.

Liber Pontificalis, ed. DUCHESNE, I, 6, 7, 162-163; cf. Introduction, LXXIV sq. XCIX; Acta Sanct., April, III, 412-415, 999-1001; De CASTRO, Difesa delta causa di S. Marcellino I, Pont. Rom. (Rome, 1819); LANGEN, Geschichte der romischen Kirche, I, 370-372; ALLARD, Histoire des persecutions, IV, 376-379; DUCHESNE, Histoire ancienne de l'Eglise, II, 92 sq.; MARUCCHI, Il sepolcro del papa Marcellino nel cimitero di Priscilla in Nuovo Bull, di archeol. crist. (1907), 115 sq. (4)

THE LIVES AND TIMES OF THE ROMAN PONTIFFS
By the CHEVALIER ARTAUD BE MONTOR:

29. ST. MARCELLINUS - A. D. 296.

THIS Saint, Marcellimis, son of Projectus, a Roman, was, according to some, a Benedictine, and was created pontiff on the 3d of May, A. D. 296. The Church never suffered more than at this terrible period. The vast edifice of idolatry, gradually ruined by the Christians, and in some of its parts destroyed, was ready to crumble to its very foundations. The heathen altars lacked flowers, and the priests lacked victims; the auspices no longer read in the entrails of slaughtered animals the signs and tokens of the future; the oracles were dumb, and the magicians were powerless. In such a state of things, it seemed as though all the gods of darkness made a last effort against the God of light. Diocletian, Maximinanus, Galerius, and Maximinus, in succession, were the four chiefs of that infernal enterprise. Galerius, the most furious of them all, had taken from Diocletian the fatal sentence which ordered that cruel persecution, at once atrocious and universal, without truce and without pity. The churches were pulled down in most of the provinces; men and women, old men, children, and virgins were alike given up to the executioners. Heaven was peopled with martyrs, and earth, at the sight of such courage, warmed into a love for Catholicism. The persecutor hoped to destroy the religion of Christ, and all that fury only served to raise the throne of the faith upon the wreck and ruins of paganism.

The States subject to Rome, watered with the blood of the persecuted, only became the more, productive of Christian branches. Tortures tore the bodies of the martyrs, but their souls, firmly embracing the faith, remained invulnerable and invincible. Nevertheless, there were some weak spirits that yielded to threats, and with whom self-love prevailed over religion; and it has even been said, that among those weak ones was Marcellinus himself. The falsehood which was circulated on this head was adorned with all the circumstances which might give it an air of probability. It was pretended that the pontiff, perceiving his fault, presented himself as a suppliant before a council of three hundred bishops, assembled at Sinnessa. There, ran the story, the culprit confessed his error, and, weeping, demanded that he should be sentenced to the punishment he had incurred; and the council replied, "Pronounce sentence on thyself; the chief See cannot be judged but by itself." But in this statement every particular is false; it is now ascertained that the accusation is calumnious, and that the pontiff committed no fault. Saint Augustine, speaking of Petilius, author of that fable, says, "He calls Marcellinus a sacrilegious wretch; I declare him innocent. It is not necessary for me to weary myself to support my defence by proofs; for Petilius himself supports his accusation by no proof." In our own days that accusation has been repeated, and it has been said, with some foundation, too, that the Roman Breviary seems to support the tale, under the date of the 26th of April. Muratori writes that it is so, and every one can convince himself of it. But Lambertini, before he was Pope, speaking of the Breviary, or of its authority, says that the fact is false. He says: "1. All the ancient writers of the Lives of the Popes are silent on that head; 2. The Donatists could never prove the truth of their assertion, and were guilty of useless impostures," and he cites those words of Saint Augustine, which we quoted above. Baronius warns us on the subject, that the Roman Church is not accustomed to have the acts of the saints read as if they were a gospel. Each, says Novaes, after Gelasus, may examine into things in conformity to the rule given by Saint Paul, when he said - "Prove all things; hold fast to that which is good." The fall of that pontiff is denied by Schelstratus, Roccaberti, Pierre de Marcas, Pierre Constant, Papebrock, Natalis Alexander, Pagi, Agiurre, Sangallo, and Xavier de Mareo, a Jesuit. The last mentioned writer has put forth that denial in a very important work "Difesa di Alcuni Pontifici accusati di errore, chap. 12, p. 140."

Thus, according to the testimony of Theodoret, it is proved that Marcellinus was distinguished for the firmness of his courage; and the imputation against him was sustained only by Petilius, and the sectarians of his time. The early Donatists never reproached the Church with such a fall of her head, eager as they were to support their own evil cause by collecting even the slightest errors of Catholic bishops, and especially of pontiffs. (5)

BREVIARIUM ROMANUM. 1906.
DIE 26. APRILIS. SS. Cleti et Marcellini, Pont, et Mart. Semiduplex:

01-Breviarium-1906-title-page
02-Breviarium-1906-imprimatur-page
03-Breviarium-1906-kalend-april
04-Breviarium-1906-kalend-26april-p545
05-Breviarium-1906-kalend-26april-p546

DIE 26. APRILIS. SS. Cleti et Marcellini, Pont, et Mart. Semiduplex.

Marcellinus Romanus, ab anno ducentesimo nonagesimo sexto ad annum trecentesimum quartum in immani imperatoris Diocletiani persecutione Ecclesiae praefuit. Multas pertulit angustias ob improbam eorum severitatem, qui eum redarguebant de nimia indulgentia erga lapsos in idololatriam, quaeque causa fuit, ut per calumniam infamattus fuerit, quasi thus idolis adhibuisset. Verum hic beatus Pontifex in confessione fidei, una cum tribus aliis Christianis, Claudio, Cyrino et Antonino, capite plexus est. Quorum projecta corpora, quum triginta sex dies jussu Imperatoris sepultura caruissent, beatus Marcellus a sancto Petro in somnis admonitus, cum presbyteris et diaconis, hymnis et luminibus adhibitis, honorifice sepelienda curavit in coemeterio Priscillae via Salaria. Rexit Ecclesiam annos septem, menses undecim, dies viginti tres: quo tempore fecit Ordinationes duas mense Decembri, quibus creavit Presbyteros quatuor, Episcopos per diversa loca quinque. (8)

Translated by Rev. German Fliess:

“Marcellinus, a Roman, ruled the Church from the year 296 to the year 304 in the cruel persecution of the emperor Diocletian. He underwent many difficulties on account of the excessive severity of some who reproached him with too great indulgence towards those who had lapsed into idolatry. This [excessive severity of his enemies] was the cause of his being calumniously defamed as having [himself] offered incense to the idols. But this blessed Pontiff was beheaded in his confession of the faith, together with three other Christians, Claudius, Cyrinus and Antoninus. Their bodies being cast out and left unburied by the emperor's order, after thirty-six days Blessed Marcellus, being admonished in a dream by St. Peter, came with priests and deacons, singing hymns and bearing lights, and took care to give bury them with honor in the cemetery of Priscilla, on the Salarian Way. He ruled the Church seven years, eleven months and twenty-three days, during which time he held two ordinations in the month of December, in which he ordained four priests and [consecrated] five bishops for various places.”

(I put between square brackets [ ], what, though not in the Latin, may be supplied in English for clearness - Rev. German Fliess)

POPES ST. MARTIN I and EUGENIUS I:

THE LIVES AND TIMES OF THE ROMAN PONTIFFS
By the CHEVALIER ARTAUD BE MONTOR:

75. ST. MARTIN I. A.D. 649.

SAINT MARTIN I, son of Fabricius, a rich and noble personage of Todi, a town in the States of the Church, was elected pope on the 5th of July, 649, and consecrated without waiting for the consent of the emperor, who afterwards accused him of taking the pontificate irregularly, and without his consent. This pope himself informs us, in a letter which is contained in Labbe's Councils (Vol. v., p. 65), that this was the reason why the pontiff of Rome was persecuted.

... At last, confined in prison, he was harshly questioned by the emperor, deprived of the pallium, dragged through the streets and courts with a chain round his neck, and chained to his jailer, as an indication that he was condemned to death. The executioner carried before Martin the headsman s sword. Staggering with weakness, and marking his passage with tracks of blood, he was then cast into another prison, where he would have died of cold had not his guards taken compassion upon him. At the end of three months he was transported to Cherson, then the place of exile of great criminals. Here this noble pontiff died of fatigue and suffering, on the 16th of September, 655.

The Romans had elected Pope Eugenius, during the life of Martin, who, from his Cherson prison, approved the election, in order that the chair of Peter should not remain vacant.

As it is requisite to establish the duration of the pontificate of Martin, the decision of the Diario of Borne is followed. It states that Martin governed the Church six years, two months, and twelve days. Novaes gives this reign only five years, two months, and three days, basing his estimate on the opinion of those authors who maintained that Martin ceased to be pope after that election of Eugenius I. which he approved of in prison.

In two ordinations, in December, Martin, previous to his exile, had created thirty-three bishops, five or eleven priests, and five deacons. His body was taken to Rome, and deposited in the church of Saint Martin ai Monti. The Latins celebrate his feast on the 12th, and the Greeks the day of his death, and also on the 13th of April, with great solemnity.

Beckoning from the departure of Martin to the election of Eugenius, the Holy See remained vacant one year, two months, and twenty days.

76. EUGENE I. A.D. 654

EUGENE I., a Roman, was elected on the 8th of September, 654, with the consent of the still living, but imprisoned pope, Saint Martin I. The Roman clergy were forced to this step by fear of seeing the election of a Monothelite pontiff. Cardinal Baronius thinks that Eugene, during the life of Martin, was only that pontiff's vicar, and did not become truly a pope until Martin's death.

Feller, in the short article that he has devoted to Eugene, says briefly: "Eugene was vicar-general of the Church during the captivity of Pope Saint Martin, and succeeded him in the pontificate in 656." (6)

THE BOOK OF SAINTS
COMPILED BY THE BENEDICTINE MONKS OF ST. AUGUSTINE'S ABBEY, RAMSGATE:

EUGENIUS I. (St.) Pope. (June 2) (7th cent.) While Pope St. Martin I was in banishment in the Chersonesus, whither he had been exiled by the Emperor Constans, Eugenius, a Roman by birth, acted as his Vicar in the West. And when it became known that St. Martin had died from the ill-usage he had received (a.d. 654), St. Eugenius was chosen to succeed him. Affable to all, his great characteristic was his care of the poor. He maintained that the revenues of the Church were their patrimony. He bravely and skillfully combated the subtle Monothelite heresy (that which denied to Christ a human will), and after a short Pontificate, passed away a.d. 657, and was buried in St. Peter's. (7)

Conclusions:

  • The imputation against Pope St. Marcellinus was sustained only by Petilius (a Donatist bishop, schismatic and heretic), and the sectarians of his time.
  • Saint Augustine, speaking of Petilius, author of that fable, says, "He calls Marcellinus a sacrilegious wretch; I declare him (St. Marcellinus) innocent. It is not necessary for me to weary myself to support my defence by proofs; for Petilius himself supports his accusation by no proof."
  • St. Eugene was vicar-general of the Church during the captivity of Pope Saint Martin (did not become truly a pope until St. Martin’s death), and succeeded him in the pontificate in 656.
  • Lies by the propagators of the "hidden pope" against Popes St. Marcellinus, St. Martin I, and St. Eugenius I must be completely rejected;
  • It is very dangerous for the soul to follow lie filled people who spread falsified biographies of the Vicars of Christ, because “A false witness shall not be unpunished: and he that speaketh lies shall not escape.” (Proverbs 19:5);
  • Catholics must trust only sources published in accordance with Ecclesiastical Legislation on Books;
  • Catholics should examine all things in conformity to the rule given by Saint Paul, when he said: "But prove all things: hold fast that which is good. From all appearance of evil refrain yourselves" (ll T0 THE THESSALONIANS 5:21-22).

Fr. Valerii

Sources:

(1) THE COMMANDMENTS EXPLAINED
According to the treaching and doctrine of the Catholic Church
BY THE REV. ARTHUR DEVINE
FOURTH EDITION
R. & T. WASHBOURNE, LTD.
1, 2 & 4 PATERNOSTER ROW, LONDON
And 248 BUCHANAN STREET, GLASGOW
BENZIGER BROS. : NEW YORK, CINCINNATI, AND CHICAGO
1906
Nihil Obstat: GULIELMUS L. GlLDEA, S.T.D.
Imprimatur. Herbertus Card. Vaughan, Archiep. Westmonast.
Die 7 Martii, 1897.
pp. 470

(2) (7) THE BOOK OF SAINTS
A DICTIONARY OF SERVANTS OF GOD CANONISED
BY THE CATHOLIC CHURCH: EXTRACTED FROM
THE ROMAN & OTHER MARTYROLOGIES
COMPILED BY THE BENEDICTINE MONKS OF
ST. AUGUSTINE'S ABBEY, RAMSGATE
A. & C. BLACK, LTD.
4, 5 and 6 SOHO SQUARE, LONDON, W. 1
1921
NIHIL OBSTAT: Innocent Apap S.Th.M.O.P. Censor Deputatus.
IMPRIMATUR: Edm. Can. Surmont. Vic. Gen. 19 Feb. 1920.
HAROLD B. LEE LIBRARY
BRIGHAM YOUNG UNIVERSITY, PROVO, UTAH
p. 177, p. 98

(3) LIVES OF THE SAINTS
With Reflections for Every Day in the Year
COMPILED FROM THE "LIVES OF THE SAINTS"
BY Rev. ALBAN BUTLER
TO WHICH ARE ADDED
LIVES OF THE AMERICAN SAINTS PLACED ON
THE CALENDAR FOR THE UNITED STATES
BY SPECIAL PETITION OF THE THIRD
PLENARY COUNCIL OF BALTIMORE
New York, Cincinnati, Chicago
BENZIGER BROTHERS
PRINTERS TO THE HOLY APOSTOLIC SEE
PUBLISHERS OF BENZIGER'S MAGAZINE
1913
Imprimatur: +Michael Augustine, Archbishop of New York
New York, January 21, 1887
Copyright, 1878, 1887, 1894, 1913, by Benziger Brothers
p. 158

(4) THE CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA
AN INTERNATIONAL WORK OF REFERENCE
ON THE CONSTITUTION, DOCTRINE, DISCIPLINE
AND HISTORY OF THE CATHOLIC CHURCH
EDITED BY CHARLES G. HERBERMANN, Ph.D., LL.D.
EDWARD A. PACE, Ph.D., D.D., CONDE B. PALLEN, Ph.D., LL.D.
THOMAS J. SHAHAN, D.D., JOHN J. WYNNE, S.J.
ASSISTED BY NUMEROUS COLLABORATORS
IN FIFTEEN VOLUMES
VOLUME IX, p. 638, 639
New York ROBERT APPLETON COMPANY
Nihil Obstat: REMY LAFOET, CENSOR, October 1, 1910
Imprimatur: +JOHN M. FARLEY, ARCHBISHOP OF NEW YORK
Copyright, 1910 By ROBERT APPLETON COMPANY

(5) (6) THE LIVES AND TIMES OF THE ROMAN PONTIFFS
FROM ST. PETER TO PIUS IX.
By the CHEVALIER ARTAUD BE MONTOR,
TRANSLATED FROM THE FRENCH
EDITED BY REV. DR. NELIGAN. Vol. I
NEW YORK: PUBLISHED BY D. & J. SADLIER & CO.,
31 BARCLAY STREET.
1867.
Approbation. WE APPROVE OF THE PUBLICATION, BY D. & J. SADLIEB & Co.,
OF ARTAUD'S 'LIVES OF THE POPES'
+ JOHN, ARCHBISHOP of NEW YORK. NEW YORK, March 30th, 1865.
p. 63, 64, 156-160

(8) BREVIARIUM ROMANUM
EX DECRETO SS. CONCILII TRIDENTINI
RESTITUTUM
S. PII V. Pontificis Marimi
JUSSU EDITUM
CLEMENTIS VIII. URBANI VIII. ET LEONIS XIII.
AUCTORITATE RECOGNITUM
MECHLINEE, TYPIS H. DESSAIN
NEO EBORACI, CINCINNATI, CHICAGO
APUD FRATRES BENZIGER
EDITORES AC BIBLIOPOLAS, S. SEDIS APOSTOLTCAE TYPOGRAPHOS.
MCMVI
Concordat cum typica editione Breviarii Romani.
Ex Secretaria Sacrorum Rituum Congregationis, die 24 Februarii 1906.
Pro R. P. D. DIOMEDE PANICI ARCHIEP. LAODICEN. Secretario.
PHILIPPUS Can. DI FAVA, Substitutiis.
D. MERCIER, ARCHIEP. MECHLIN.
De mandato Illmi ac Rmi Dni Archiep.
F. VAN OLMEN, Secret.
Mechliniae, die 24 Martii 1906.
p. 545, 546

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